2015: Looking Back

Happy New Year!

It’s been a short 2015 for us—the AGNI blog only got started this last September—but it’s been a full one. We’ve been able host the thoughts of twenty-seven of AGNI’s contributors—writers and artists who’ve used the space to explore ideas, pose questions, raise up the authors they love, poke and prod at the publishing world, and look behind the scenes of the poems, stories, and essays they’ve published in AGNI. We’re really looking forward to more.

In the meantime, with the end of the year upon us, we thought it’d be a good moment to revisit our five most-viewed posts of 2015. If you haven’t checked them out yet, have a look!

5. “What the Actress Told Me” by Margo Berdeshevsky:

Margo copy
“We, who want to be loved. Famous. Infamous. I who whisper sometimes, just let the words be good enough. Do I really mean good enough for something or someone—too good to name? When I’m honest, I think I do.”

 

4. “‘All the Deceits of the World’: Poetry and Spirituality” by Emilia Phillips:

“For me, spirituality is the belief in, acceptance, and willing experience of the unknown, and reading poetry is an ecstatic exercise in blind-leading-the-blind agnosticism. The poetry I value most, perhaps paradoxically, allows for, yet draws close to what can’t be said, the ineffabilis, the ‘not utterable.’”
“For me, spirituality is the belief in, acceptance, and willing experience of the unknown, and reading poetry is an ecstatic exercise in blind-leading-the-blind agnosticism. The poetry I value most, perhaps paradoxically, allows for, yet draws close to what can’t be said, the ineffabilis, the ‘not utterable.’”

 

3.“Why I Write” by Jeffrey Thomson

“I write because I love the sound of words and the sense of sentences. I write because neither of these things are enough, because the words get it wrong and sentences are loose nets with which I try to haul up the sea.”
“I write because I love the sound of words and the sense of sentences. I write because neither of these things are enough, because the words get it wrong and sentences are loose nets with which I try to haul up the sea.”

 

2. “On Accepting—and Leaving—Mentors” by Jayne Benjulian

“The longer you write, the more you fortify your own ear, and the more eccentric your voice becomes. That is the nature of art—if it weren’t, it would be wallpaper. People who never liked your work will dislike it even more. To my mind, in order to mature as a poet, you have to exploit your own gifts.”
“The longer you write, the more you fortify your own ear, and the more eccentric your voice becomes. That is the nature of art—if it weren’t, it would be wallpaper. People who never liked your work will dislike it even more. To my mind, in order to mature as a poet, you have to exploit your own gifts.”

 

And our most-viewed post:
“Milton and the Machine” by Simon DeDeo

 “I’m a scientist as well as a poet. I study complex systems, which at this late stage in humankind’s knowledge means that I get to study everything we don’t understand.”
“I’m a scientist as well as a poet. I study complex systems, which at this late stage in humankind’s knowledge means that I get to study everything we don’t understand.”

 

Here’s to a new year of good literature and good conversations; we’ll do our best to help. Happy New Year to you all!

agni blog logo smaller

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s